Tennessee Alumnus

Project of the Year

University of Tennessee Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries student Emily Hockman launches a weather balloon equipped with an aerial acoustic recording system. The system was used to listen for the calls of at-risk avian species on DoD facilities. Photo courtesy UTIA

A project led by Dave Buehler, professor in the department of forestry, wildlife and fisheries, was named the U.S. Department of Defense’s Environmental Security Technology Certification program’s project of the year for 2016 for resource conservation and resiliency.

The effort tracked threatened, endangered and at-risk avian species at defense facilities using weather balloons to transport an autonomous aerial acoustic recording system to inaccessible areas of the installations.

The systems recorded sounds of bird species and provided tracking telemetry to correlate the audio data to the flight paths to locate specific species.

The recording system is a UTIA project that’s working to protect the environment by improving the Department of Defense’s ability to comply with environmental regulations and legislation.

Cross Takes the Reins

Tim Cross

Tim Cross assumed his new role as UT Institute of Agriculture chancellor on Jan. 1. A well-known Tennessee leader, Cross had served as interim chancellor since September and formerly was dean of UT Extension. His experience with the statewide organization spans 23 years.

These roles have given Cross direct understanding of the needs of Tennesseans, whether in rural or urban areas, and he’s seen how the institute’s teaching, research and extension outreach deliver solutions.

You’re Invited!

Visitors to the Summer Celebration Lawn and Garden Show can enjoy “walkand- talk” tours of the many artfully designed display beds at the UT Gardens, Jackson. Summer Celebration is Thursday, July 14, from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Photo of a previous summer celebration tour by L. Vath, courtesy UTIA.

The Institute of Agriculture is nationally known for its robust educational workshops and field days. Conducted at locations acrossTennessee, the workshops focus on topics of interest to homeowners, gardeners, owners of hobby farms and owners of acreage too small to be considered large-scale producers. Events this year are scheduled from May through October. Often the events are held at UT agricultural research and education centers for the public to see firsthand the important research in their communities. Check out the calendar online at ag.tennessee.edu for an event near you.